Shopping for Kids’ Books (ages 9 to 12)?

Here’s my latest menu of books for hungry readers. I’ve read all of these (and many others) this year and you can see my reviews on Goodreads by clicking on the titles or covers of the books.

Feel free to share and to comment about favorite books you’ve read this year for 9 to 12 year olds!

Books for everyone!!! 🙂

Click on the “download” up above to get the one with links to my book reviews on GoodReads.

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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share a new book recommendation for readers ages 9 to 12, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.

Thanks for the review copy! How do I redeem a promo code on Apple iBooks?

If you met me at a conference and got a CODE for a free review Apple iBooks copy of TROUBLE WITH PARSNIPS, this post is for you. 🙂

(If you got a link instead of a promo code, you don’t need this post. Just type the link into your browser. Happy reading!)

Quick Version: How to use a promo code to get your review copy on your iPhone, iPad, Mac or iPod touch:

Click on the ebook image below to go to the iBooks Store:
ad for Kobo Canada sale showing Trouble with Parsnips on an ereader and the High Water Tower at Cochem that inspired the Palace Agricultural Library

If you need more detail:
1. find the “Redeem” menu in the iBooks Store: Scroll down below the “More Books Like This” section and look under “Manage”. Click on “Redeem”.

Scroll down below the "More Books Like This" section to find "Redeem". It's under the "Manage" list.

2. When you click “Redeem”, this window pops up. Ignore the part about “Use Camera”. Type your promo code in the box. Then click “Redeem”.

3. Hopefully, this success window pops up:Screenshot of "successfully redeemed your code"4. A smaller pop-up will tell you when the download is complete. Click OK and then the “DONE” button in the lower right-hand corner.

5. When The iBooks store loads, click on the “LIBRARY” button in the top Left-Hand corner to see the your new book in the library. Happy Reading!

If you enjoy it, your review will help other readers find it in your corner of the world. The people of the Seven Kingdoms thank you!!!!

 

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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share a new book recommendation for readers ages 9 to 12, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.

Reviews for TROUBLE WITH PARSNIPS

TADA!!! The very first STUDENT review from an amazing student in Japan:

Review of Trouble With Parsnips framed with colorful parsnips
My very first review from a student!!! SO exciting!! I’m so touched and grateful that she took the time to read and think about and write about the book.
Recent reviews on GoodReads, Barnes & Noble, and other stores:

Thank YOU SO MUCH to all of the reviewers! After all my time in the “drafting cave” and the “revision cave,” it’s a treat to hear your reactions to the finished story.

If you’ve posted a review, please let me know here. I’d love to see it!

Reviews give stories wings–they really do!

*They also keep them books going invisible.*

Thanks to the trouble you took to write and post your reviews, TROUBLE WITH PARSNIPS is on its way to find readers who are looking for just this kind of story.

The people of the Seven Kingdoms curtsy and bow to you!! Hip, Hip, Hooray! (Except Queen Ash, but then, she never thanks anybody.)

May you always have a good book, a snack, and time to enjoy them both!

5 star review from Amazon.co.uk
From Amazon.co.uk

Just found out from Twitter that PARSNIPS got its very first review on Toppsta, a beautiful UK site that curates children’s books.

screenshot of Tweet from reviewer in response to my post asking for a review: "Done! Can't wait for the rest in the series to add to my classroom bookshelf."

screenshot of Toppsta review of TROUBLE WITH PARSNIPS

An inventive story about a spunky princess. A great deal of magical details and a lot of humour. A really fun an inventive read. ( )
1 vote KatiaGuzzardi | Jan 29, 2019
 
 
TROUBLE WITH PARSNIPS got its first review on Kobo!
screenshot of first review for PARSNIPS on Kobo

A deliciously long review for Trouble With Parsnips showed up!

It is always a good sign when I finish a book in one night. I did it with Harry Potters 4/5/6 & 7; Garth Nix’s Sabriel, Lirael, Abhorsen; Philip Pullman’s novels were regularly devoured into the small hours; Terry Pratchett had me laughing while my eyes were held open with matchsticks* and now I can add this hilarious and hugely entertaining novel, Trouble with Parsnips to the list. Read J.G. Jones’ complete review here on GoodReads


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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share a new book recommendation for readers ages 9 to 12, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.

A Generous Giveaway with “All the Feels” from the authors of The Emotion Thesaurus, 2nd ed.!

 Authors Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi’s have a brand new edition of The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression!

This second edition has 55 new entries and twice as much teaching material. Since I use their thesauruses (thesauri?) as a kind of shopping mall for whatever scene I’m writing, more is definitely better.

I’m looking forward to getting a copy as soon as it is available. If you’re wondering how I use a book like this, check out my earlier posts here:

The Reverse Backstory Tool Brings Your Characters to Life

Write Believable Heroes, Villains, and Emotions with The Positive/Negative Trait Thesauri and The Emotion Thesaurus

A Mini-M.F.A. in the Psychology of Character

Are you feeling it? Emotional Connection in Fiction Part 1

Tools: Emotional Connection in Fiction Part 2

Anyway, if you want to look into it further, you can read some of the reviews on Goodreads or find more information here. 

Also, one more thing to share…a MEGA-OPPORTUNITY to win something amazing!

GIVEAWAY ALERT:

To celebrate the new book & its dedicated readers, Angela and Becca have an unbelievable giveaway on right now: one person will win a free writing retreat, conference, workshop, or professional membership to a writing organization, winner’s choice (up to $500 US, with some other conditions which are listed on the WHW site).

What conference would you attend if the fee was already paid for…or would you choose a retreat? Something else? Decisions, decisions! This giveaway ends on February 26th, so hurry over and enter!

 

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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share a new book recommendation for readers ages 9 to 12, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.

Coming to a library near you? The Joy of Holds + Recommendations for eBooks

The very first library to get a copy of TROUBLE WITH PARSNIPS. Thank you Florham Park Public Library!

Today–all my friends who love libraries–I’m going to tell you a secret that will make you very happy.

HOLDS

If you are a library regular, you probably know you can put a “hold” on an exciting new book. You can do the same thing with ebooks.

After the ebook you requested is returned, it can be automatically be checked out to you. (Unless you have too many books checked out–then you have to return something first. So if you normally have too many books checked out, don’t take the automatic check out option.)

Screen shot of "Place a Hold" button next to Megan Whalen Turner's THE THIEF in Overdrive.
6 months wait time for Megan Whalen Turner’s THE THIEF. It’s worth it. (Not middle grade.)

In the days of paper lists, a dear friend always asked to be added to the list for whatever book everyone was waiting for. Now that’s using your library!

BTW, don’t you LOVE getting those library emails that a book is waiting for you? A major holiday!

But wait, there’s more. . . .TA DA!!!!!

RECOMMENDATIONS

You can recommend ebooks the library doesn’t own yet. This is perfect for that wonderful book on Twitter that you’ll forget the title before you can buy a copy.

How to recommend an ebook from your computer:
1. Brute force method: Login to your local libary online. Find Overdrive. Type the title into Overdrive’s search box. If the library doesn’t own it, you can click on the red or orange “Recommend”. (See below for an example ;)) Your favorite authors will thank you forever!!

2. Elegant-if-it-works method: Click on the image below to go to the Overdrive site. “Find your Library” and if they don’t have the book, you can click on “show me books my library doesn’t own”. Then Overdrive should offer you the book with a “Recommend” button.

screenshot of Trouble With Parsnips bookcover and Recommend button and Read a Sample button
If your local library doesn’t have my book, you can recommend it on Overdrive with one click. Thanks for the boost! Of course this works for Megan Whalen Turner’s newest too. 🙂

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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share a new book recommendation for readers ages 9 to 12, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.

Want to read a brand-new children’s book? Spoiler: It’s mine. :)

My first children’s book is coming out today in paperback!!! And ebook!! and Kindle!! YAY!

*dances from living room to kitchen and back*

WARNING: There are root vegetables involved. And princesses. And a dessert sluice with cream puffs. But the nameless princess of Cochem has it, um, under control.

paperback of Trouble With Parsnips a middle grade story about speaking up

Because I’m shy and retiring, you can read about it over at The Winged Pen.

Or you can find out more here, including the links for ebook, Kindle and reading it at your library.

Thanks so much for your interest!

Regards,

Laurel

p.s. Hope you enjoy it!

8 Ways Books are Better Than Scrolls: eBooks of the Ancient World

book cover of Libraries in the Ancient WorldWhile trying to figure out how ancient books were repaired, I came across the delightful Libraries in the Ancient World by Lionel Casson. It’s a small, friendly sort of book, clearly written and even the black and white illustrations are fascinating.

If you asked for a book in an ancient library, a page would bring you a bucketful of rolled-up parchment or papyrus with tags on them. You’d sit down and rummage through to find the chapter you wanted to read.

Chapter 8: From Roll to Codex is all about how a change in reading technology affects readers. What did the change mean for book lovers of long ago?

  1. Good for travel–no fragile edges to crumble, no tags to fall off and get lost.
  2. Space-saving–Carry more information in a smaller space because the writers can use both sides of the paper. Twice the capacity. 🙂
  3. Read with one hand–a scroll takes two hands: one to unroll and one to re-roll.
  4. Bookmarks–mark any page or even any line.
  5. Find information quickly–just flip to the page, no more endless scrolling.
  6. “Public libraries had to adjust” to the new format. Instead of cubbies holding three layers of scrolls max, books could be stacked up on top of each other.
  7. “Standard” took a while–Casson gives the example of a book that had quires–the smaller bundles of pages sewn together to make a book–in all different sizes: 5-sheet, 4-sheet, 1-sheet, 5-sheet, 5-sheet, 8-sheet.
  8. Authors had to advertise or explain the new format. Some things never change. 🙂

This little slender book, at Tryphon’s store,

costs just four coppers, and not a penny more.

Is four too much? It puts you in the red?

Then pay him two; he’ll still come out ahead.

–Casson, Lionel. Libraries in the Ancient World, Yale University Press, 2001, pg. 104.

Sound familiar?

Casson studied Egyptian literature by era to see how many were scrolls and how many were codices (books as we know them). Christians were early adopters of the new books. Bibles were made only as codices from the 2nd or 3rd centuries on.

bar chart showing % books versus scrolls by century in Egyptian 'finds'.
By studying Egyptian ‘finds’, Lionel Casson figured out how long it took Egyptian readers to adopt the ‘codex’–the book form–over a roll of parchment or papyrus: about 400 years.

Just for fun, compare to these e-book adoption percentages for U.S. readers (17%, 23%, 28%) and the increase in tablet use for reading:

 

There’s a great photo of a 7th century wooden writing tablet with ten leaves (pg. 127). It looks like a stack of pioneer school child slates fastened together. Here’s an example from Pinterest to give you the idea.

Heavy-duty.

If that’s what a notebook was like, no wonder everyone wanted parchment books instead.

Hope you enjoyed this field trip to the ancient world!

Happy reading and writing!

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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share new middle grade fiction, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.