Infographic of 7 revision management tips battery icons

Tame Your Revision Step-by-Step: 4 Ways to INVENTORY

Infographic of 7 revision management tips battery icons

This post is part of a TAME YOUR REVISION series that started over at The Winged Pen. You can read the overview, find the links to all the posts, and download the infographic here.

Feel free to share your best revision strategies in the comments! I’d love to know how you manage.

  1. Scene List.
    Scrivener’s Freeform option lets you move “Index Cards” around without changing the order of your story.

    See what you’ve got already. Or what has to happen to get to the story’s next big scene. Scrivener has a Freeform option that lets you move virtual Index Cards around until you find the order you like.  If you choose the Or you can write it out long-hand to get away from the screen.

Infographic timeline by Act of story for Too Late for Parsnips divided into two columns red for "on-stage" and purple for "off-stage"
Overview of my middle grade fantasy, TOO LATE FOR PARSNIPS. Small forces me to keep it simple.

 

 

 

2. Timeline.

This timeline is for my work-in-progress. Note: Contains both spoilers and things that aren’t true any more. And no, I’m not telling you which is which. 😉

Canva is a free online graphics program.
Depending on your personality type, it can be either a defense against the overcomplication gene or a rabbit hole. Make wise choices. 😉

To make something like this, sign up for a free Canva account, click on the green “Create a design” button and choose “Blog Graphic.” Name it something meaningful (you can click on the name to change it later.) Scroll down through the layouts to see what works for your story. I picked a free layout titled “Fiction versus Non-Fiction.” (You’ll recognize the Tame Your Revision layout too.) Use the simple editing tools to modify the layout.

 

3. Map the Major Scenes. Sometimes you can’t write the scene because you can’t visualize the setting. Try this exercise from Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi. Check out these writing maps or make one of your own for first drafts. If you’re further into your story, you might be inspired by these beautiful fictional maps.

4. Colored Markers. The non-computer methods work when nothing else will. Print it out, cut it up, and label each chunk with a sticky. Try the color-coding thing for each character to keep track of who’s where or what the dialogue’s doing.

The goal: Keep your inner critic busy. Let the story escape.

Happy Revising!

Got any good revision tips? Share them in the comments–save a writer’s sanity.

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If you’d like to stay in touch, sign up for my Reader’s List. Once a month, I share new middle grade fiction, story-related freebies, and/or related blog posts. If it’s not your thing, you can unsubscribe at any time.

 

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Published by

Laurel Decher

LAUREL DECHER writes stories about all things Italian, vegetable, or musical. Beloved pets of the past include "Stretchy the Leech" and a guinea pig that unexpectedly produced twins. She's famous for a nonexistent sense of direction, but carries maps because people always ask her for directions. When she's not lost, she can be found on Twitter and on her blog, This Is An Overseas Post, where she writes about life with her family in Germany. She's still a Vermonter and an epidemiologist at heart. PSA: Eat more kale! :) Her short fiction for adults, UNFORESEEN TIMES, originally appeared in _Windhover_. Photo: © Jane Joo Park, 2017.

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